Wednesday, June 7

Assalamualaikum everyone. At this time I would like to share to you a great article from the expert about how to use ICT.
It’s no secret that technology has become more central in our everyday lives than ever before. It helps us in every aspect of our lives, from health and fitness to creativity and social communication. As we discussed, an estimated 22 million students are benefiting from the online distance learning industry, which is worth around $70 billion (£45 billion). But how can students benefit from today’s technological advancements in the four skill areas to make their learning as well rounded as possible? Find out below.

Reading

With the rise of iPads, tablets and e-readers like the Kindle, we’ve come accustomed to a more interactive reading experience, which is a wonderful feature for English learners. Functions like click-to-define, vocabulary builders, and downloading whole texts at the touch of a button are all beneficial to a learner looking for a fun and effective way to improve their reading and writing in particular. It can help to expand your vocabulary and expose you to different sentence structures: start by reading our pick of nine great novels to improve your English.

Writing

One of the most well-known technological advancements for writing is the unassuming word processor. Simple tools such as a dictionary and a thesaurus help writers expand their vocabulary, while spelling- and grammar-checkers are helpful to find and correct errors. Moving forward to the internet age and online forums are a widely used channel for learners to communicate and learn from one another using the written word. This is also a great alternative for those who don’t have the opportunity to converse with a native speaker face to face.

Listening

They began as simple audio on a cassette tape and today’s audiobooks have taken over the literary world. As we found in our global survey of 6,000 English language learners, 44% of respondents said speaking was the most difficult aspect of learning English. When it comes to improving both comprehension and speaking skills, extensive listening is highly recommended. Listening to and reading text at the same time is a great way to start and Kindle’s Whispersync for Voice technology is designed for just this purpose. It includes audio with selected books, so you can listen and follow the text as you read.
Podcasts are also becoming more popular with English learners, with the ability to listen anytime, anywhere, and English language podcasts are a great way to improve your listening skills. Here are some popular podcasts to try: Listen to English by Peter Carter, Elementary Podcasts by the British Council and Luke’s English Podcast.

Speaking

Giving learners the advantage of communicating in real-time conversations with English speakers, probably the most exciting (and futuristic) technological advancement has come in the form of Skype and FaceTime. Tools such as video-conferencing also offer teachers the opportunity to link to other classes around the world, also gaining support from other teachers and students.
There are many new apps on the market for speaking with other learners, such as CoffeeStrap and HelloTalk – meaning you can converse with native speakers right from your phone. No webcam required anymore!
These technological advancements can help you advance in your English learning; you just need to take advantage of them and they’re right at your fingertips.
Source: https://www.english.com/blog/students-can-use-technology-improve-english

Tuesday, June 6

UNESCO - its country and regional offices as well as institutes ––in collaboration with its partners, develops resources that can help countries elaborate effective ICTs in education policies, strategies and activities. This includes ensuring that strategies meet the challenges caused by the digital divide and the most disadvantaged populations.

Its programme includes:
  • Capacity building and policy advice for the use of technologies in education, particularly in emerging domains such as mobile learning
  • Ensuring that teachers have the skills necessary to use ICTs in all aspects of their professional practice  through tools such as the  ICT Competency Framework for Teachers (ICT CFT)
  • Supporting the use and development of multilingual educational resources and software which are available for use and re-use as a result of open licenses (open educational resources – OER; free and open source software – FOSS)
  • Promoting ICTs for inclusive education, including for persons with disabilities and gender equality
  • Collecting statistics and developing indicators on the use of ICTs in education
  • Providing policy support to ensure that the potential of ICTs are harnessed effectively throughout the education system.
The UNESCO Institute for Information Technologies in Education (IITE), based in Moscow, specializes in information exchange, research and training on the integration of ICTs in education.
UNESCO’s Bangkok office is notably involved in ICTs for Education in Asia and the Pacific.
UNESCO works with the educational community worldwide – Ministries of Education, specialised institutions, teachers, and of course learners - to effectively leverage the potential of ICTs in order to benefit quality teaching and learning.


Source: http://en.unesco.org/themes/ict-education
Vid source: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=K8tTJZw59Fc

Monday, June 5

E-learning is a very important thing these days. It really crucial for the education and maybe for country's development too. However, Indonesia is still lack of it. Education in Indonesia is facing some major problems related to access and quality. Only about half of the eligible children are enrolled in school at the junior secondary level and only one-third at the senior secondary level. Regarding quality, large proportions of students fail to meet the cutoff scores in various subjects at all levels in school completion examinations. ICT is viewed as a potential contributor to solutions for these problems. In terms of government policy for ICT, Telematika which refers to the utilization of ICT in various sectors and aspects of life, was established based on a presidential decree, and Telematika Pendidikan (utilization of ICT in education) has been developed, and a five-year action plan was implemented in the years 2001 to 2005. The success of Telematika depends on the availability of appropriate infrastructure. Currently, Indonesia has 8 million Internet users (about 3% of the population); other statistics show that the ICT infrastructure is less extensive compared with neighboring countries such as Singapore, Malaysia, and Thailand. In addition, Internet access costs are still prohibitive in Indonesia. The implementation of E-Learning in Indonesian education can be viewed as a supplement, a complement, or a substitute for the traditional teaching-learning process. To date some subjects of the senior secondary school and vocational school curriculum have been developed in the form of E-Learning as a substitute for face-to-face instruction. In the near future this will be expanded to some subjects of the junior secondary school curriculum. At the tertiary education level, there are some universities that have implemented E-Learning, especially as a supplement for their regular teaching-learning process. In regard to extending access into schools, the Ministry of National Education has been piloting Open Senior Secondary School in seven districts of six provinces by implementing E-Learning.

Source: http://db.koreascholar.com/article?code=244040

Sunday, June 4

Hi everyone! Assalamualaikum. Today I will share to you about the characteristics of 21st century teacher, how right now and future teachers should be like. 

Recent technological advances have affected many areas of our lives: the way we communicate, collaborate, learn, and, of course, teach. Along with that, those advances necessitated an expansion of our vocabulary, producing definitions such as digital natives, digital immigrants, and, the topic of this post -- "21st-century teacher."
As I am writing this post, I am trying to recall if I ever had heard phrases such as "20th-century teacher" or "19th-century teacher." Quick Google search reassures me that there is no such word combination. Changing the "20th" to "21st" brings different results: a 21st-century school, 21st-century education, 21st-century teacher, 21st-century skills -- all there! I then searched for Twitter hashtags and Amazon books, and the results were just the same; nothing for the "20th-century teacher" while a lot for the "21st": #teacher21, #21stcenturyskills, #21stCTeaching and no books with titles #containing "20th century" while quite a few on the 21st-century teaching and learning.
Obviously, teaching in the 21-century is an altogether different phenomenon; never before could learning be happening the way it is now -- everywhere, all the time, on any possible topic, supporting any possible learning style or preference. But what does being a 21st-century teacher really mean?
Below are 15 characteristics of a 21st-century teacher:
1. Learner-Centered Classroom and Personalized Instructions
As students have access to any information possible, there certainly is no need to "spoon-feed" the knowledge or teach "one-size fits all" content. As students have different personalities, goals, and needs, offering personalized instructions is not just possible but also desirable. When students are allowed to make their own choices, they own their learning, increase intrinsic motivation, and put in more effort -- an ideal recipe for better learning outcomes!
2. Students as Producers
Today's students have the latest and greatest tools, yet, the usage in many cases barely goes beyond communicating with family and friends via chat, text, or calls. Even though students are now viewed as digital natives, many are far from producing any digital content. While they do own expensive devices with capabilities to produce blogs, infographics, books, how-to videos, and tutorials, just to name a few, in many classes, they are still asked to turn those devices off and work with handouts and worksheets. Sadly, often times these papers are simply thrown away once graded. Many students don't even want to do them, let alone keep or return them later. When given a chance, students can produce beautiful and creative blogs, movies, or digital stories that they feel proud of and share with others.
3. Learn New Technologies
In order to be able to offer students choices, having one's own hands-on experience and expertise will be useful. Since technology keeps developing, learning a tool once and for all is not a option. The good news is that new technologies are new for the novice and and experienced teachers alike, so everyone can jump in at any time! I used a short-term subscription to www.lynda.com, which has many resources for learning new technologies.
4. Go Global
Today's tools make it possible to learn about other countries and people first hand. Of course, textbooks are still sufficient, yet, there is nothing like learning languages, cultures, and communication skills from actually talking to people from other parts of the world.
It's a shame that with all the tools available, we still learn about other cultures, people, and events from the media. Teaching students how to use the tools in their hands to "visit" any corner of this planet will hopefully make us more knowledgable and sympathetic.
5. Be Smart and Use Smart Phones
Once again -- when students are encouraged to view their devices as valuable tools that support knowledge (rather than distractions), they start using them as such. I remember my first years of teaching when I would not allow cell phones in class and I'd try to explain every new vocabulary word or answer any question myself -- something I would not even think of doing today!
I have learned that different students have different needs when it comes to help with new vocabulary or questions; therefore, there is no need to waste time and explain something that perhaps only one or two students would benefit from. Instead, teaching students to be independent and know how to find answers they need makes the class a different environment!
I have seen positive changes ever since I started viewing students' devices as useful aid. In fact, sometimes I even respond by saying "I don't know -- use Google and tell us all!" What a difference in their reactions and outcomes!
6. Blog
I have written on the importance of both student and teacher blogging. Even my beginners of English could see the value of writing for real audience and establishing their digital presence. To blog or not to blog should not be a question any more!
7. Go Digital
Another important attribute is to go paperless -- organizing teaching resources and activities on one's own website and integrating technology bring students learning experience to a different level. Sharing links and offering digital discussions as opposed to a constant paper flow allows students to access and share class resources in a more organized fashion.
8. Collaborate
Technology allows collaboration between teachers & students. Creating digital resources, presentations, and projects together with other educators and students will make classroom activities resemble the real world. Collaboration should go beyond sharing documents via e-mail or creating PowerPoint presentations. Many great ideas never go beyond a conversation or paper copy, which is a great loss! Collaboration globally can change our entire experience!
9. Use Twitter Chat
Participating in Twitter chat is the cheapest and most efficient way to organize one's own PD, share research and ideas, and stay current with issues and updates in the field. We can grow professionally and expand our knowledge as there is a great conversation happening every day, and going to conferences is no longer the only way to meet others and build professional learning networks.
10. Connect
Connect with like-minded individuals. Again, today's tools allow us to connect anyone, anywhere, anytime. Have a question for an expert or colleague? Simply connect via social media: follow, join, ask, or tell!
11. Project-Based Learning
As today's students have an access to authentic resources on the web, experts anywhere in the world, and peers learning the same subject somewhere else, teaching with textbooks is very "20th-century" (when the previously listed option were not available). Today's students should develop their own driving questions, conduct their research, contact experts, and create final projects to share all using devices already in their hands. All they need from their teacher is guidance!
12. Build Your Positive Digital Footprint
It might sound obvious, but it is for today's teachers to model how to appropriately use social media, how to produce and publish valuable content, and how to create sharable resources. Even though it's true that teachers are people, and they want to use social media and post their pictures and thoughts, we cannot ask our students not to do inappropriate things online if we ourselves do it. Maintaining professional behavior both in class and online will help build positive digital footprint and model appropriate actions for students.
13. Code
While this one might sound complicated, coding is nothing but today's literacy. As a pencil or pen were "the tools" of the 20th-century, making it impossible to picture a teacher not capable to operate with it, today's teacher must be able to operate with today's pen and pencil, i.e., computers. Coding is very interesting to learn -- the feeling of writing a page with HTML is amazing! Even though I have ways to go, just like in every other field, a step at a time can take go a long way. Again, lynda.com is a great resource to start with!
14. Innovate
I invite you to expand your teaching toolbox and try new ways you have not tried before, such as teaching with social media or replacing textbooks with web resources. Not for the sake of tools but for the sake of students!
Ever since I started using TED talks and my own activities based on those videos, my students have been giving a very different feedback. They love it! They love using Facebook for class discussions and announcements. They appreciate novelty -- not the new tools, but the new, more productive and interesting ways of using them.
15. Keep Learning
As new ways and new technology keep emerging, learning and adapting is essential. The good news is: it's fun, and even 20 min a day will take you a long way!
Source: https://www.edutopia.org/discussion/15-characteristics-21st-century-teacher